Does R Ashwin overthink his cricket?

He says he doesn’t. He says the fact that he asks questions indicates only that he’s ‘a learner’.

It’s hard to disagree with this assessment, but then you read his recent interview with Sidharth Monga for Cricinfo and you start to wonder. He has a way of talking about bowling that makes you want to slope off and talk to someone else for a bit.

“I was pretty interested in the kind of balance I was managing at the crease. I felt I was not in the best balanced position to deliver the entire momentum towards the batsman.

 

“Whatever I gather as momentum of my run-up and my loading is all destined to put the ball into the batsman’s half. So I will have to translate each bit of it into the ball before I deliver it. And if I dissipate any of my energy before I deliver it, I am losing out on my maximum force or maximum penetration.

 

“To be in the best balanced position is the best possible way to put the ball at the maximum penetration. I felt I was being a little imbalanced.”

Then, perhaps aware how this might come across, he translates all of that for us: “I felt like I was falling over.”

He also said that like an old ZX Spectrum, he had ‘a loading issue’. “Whatever happens in the lower body is in direct relation to what is happening in the upper body, as far as bowling is concerned,” he sort-of-explains.

“In Adelaide I was playing around with my loading positions with my right hand. When that was happening I suddenly discovered something.

 

“I felt like there was more cocking to the wrist. There were revolutions on the ball. The amount of finger-split I use on the ball was completely coming into use. There was more uncoiling and coiling.”

We can feel you pondering the finger-split coming into use and the additional uncoiling and coiling. We can see you pondering it and pondering and ultimately drifting into a stupor.

It’s all rather baffling. In fact some of it’s so baffling it sounds like it’s comes out of the mouth of Mark E Smith. Trust us, even in context the following makes no sense.

“One times two is two. Two times two is four. If you teach a first-standard kid today, tomorrow he is bound to forget the multiplication table.

 

“It happens with a cricketer also. It is a completely new skill. It is an education in itself. Patience – I find it extremely clichéd. It is not pertinent to only the game.”

We do however like the poetry of this comment about his lifestyle when he was younger.

“When I was playing first-class cricket, sometimes I used to go to sleep at 11.30 in the night. And wake up at 6.30. Not exactly have my box of nuts. Not exactly drink my water.”

But if the rhythm of that’s nice, it’s still not clear. It’s almost as if he feels there’s some sort of risk in being straightforward.

“So what is the risk I am taking by being straightforward? By being straightforward I am being mistaken for being a person that I am not. On the other hand, if I am not straightforward, I lose happiness.”

Presumably he’s not exactly on top of the world right now.

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6 Appeals

  1. “In Adelaide I was playing around with my loading positions with my right hand. When that was happening I suddenly discovered something.”

    Something similar happened to me when I was about 12, as it did for the vast majority of other young males at that age, I’d imagine…

    “Whatever I gather as momentum of my run-up and my loading is all destined to put the ball into the batsman’s half. So I will have to translate each bit of it into the ball before I deliver it. And if I dissipate any of my energy before I deliver it, I am losing out on my maximum force or maximum penetration.”

    He’s a spinner, FFS. He’s not trying to ‘translate each bit of his momentum’ into knocking the batsman’s block off at 90mph or anything!

    A Pseud’s Corner entry in Private Eye beckons for young Ravichandran, methinks.

  2. He is not

    appreciated.

  3. What would be interesting is to get V.Sehwag’s reaction to all these statements. Yes, he of the “see ball, hit ball” philosophy.

  4. I clearly remember being a kid who did not forget his multiplication tables the next day. I never postponed to the next day what I could do that day, that instant.

  5. I’d quite like to see a “compare and contrast” article, showing the stated opinions of R Ashwin c/w K Roach on various topics.

    You could publish it around Halloween and headline the piece “Dick or Tweet”.

  6. I think the point was International cricket was a step up for him from First Class cricket but he has learned to bridge that gap now

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