EXCLUSIVE! Rob Key’s position on snow revealed!

Rob Key

And by ‘exclusive’ we mean that we reported information that was already publicly available for a third party before pointing you towards it from here.

This week’s Twitter round-up has just gone up on Cricinfo. Critics are calling it ‘recently published and currently without comments’.

Needless to say, we’ve led with Rob Key and later on it also features something called ‘The Big Wedge’ which is surely deserving of your time.

If today’s King Cricket update and the somewhat ‘less is more’ nature of our entire output this week has left you wanting more, you might also think about signing up for Cricket Badger.

You’ve missed this week’s, but there should be another instalment around 10am next Friday. Critics are calling it ‘weekly’.

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14 Appeals

  1. Thanks for bringing us this joyous tidbit, on this of all depressing days (has WW3 started yet?!)

    I was hoping Sir Robert of Key’s position on snow was flat on his arse having just fallen on it, but I’ve enjoyed that thought in my mind sufficiently.

    Finally, it appears you have another new fan:

    SQUARELEGS ON JANUARY 20, 2017, 14:58 GMT
    Can someone enlighten me here? Is my browser not showing me something it should? Am I not initiated into some strange new fad or technology? All I can see in this article is a succession of often unconnected and seemingly largely inane comments, none of which seems remotely relevant to the title, and a number of hyphens inserted in between.

    That’s either a stinging rebuke, or their browser’s not displaying the tweets. I prefer the former. Either way, more of this sort of thing please.

    • King Cricket

      January 20, 2017 at 6:15 pm

      Critics are calling it, “a succession of often unconnected and seemingly largely inane comments, none of which seems remotely relevant to the title, and a number of hyphens inserted in between.”

      • Critics are also calling it, “incomprehensible blabber”, –

        – – – –

        —–

        – but it is hard to tell whether they are referring to your blabber or the tweeters blabber…

        …which makes the comment itself incomprehensible blabber. The circularity of this argument is doing my head in at this hour on a Friday.

      • Bladderwrack

  2. Meaning of blabber in English. noun. one who reveals confidential information in return for money .

    I found this in a Hindi dictionary, that doesn’t mean that bribery or other gambling misdeeds are involved.

  3. This just in from Mr Hughes on TMS:

    “Ravichandran Ashwin describes himself as a “cricket badger”. He admitted to me that he was sat in bed the other morning watching the women’s Big Bash.”

    • I want to hate him. But I can’t. The new Murali? (Except his batting isn’t quite as entertaining.)

    • Sometimes I like to sit in bed and watch a women’s big bash.

      Steady on.

      • King Cricket

        January 23, 2017 at 9:45 am

        Such a massive cricket fan he’ll even watch women’s cricket? The Analyst is perhaps expressing something about his own perceptions of the sport with his use of the word ‘admitted’ there.

        Remember reading an Indian newspaper in about 2001 and seeing results of women’s under-17 tennis ball cricket matches. That could legitimately be described as niche. Not sure the women’s Big Bash falls into that category.

      • One hand, one bounce?

        Steady on.

      • People admit stuff in cricket articles all the time. Usually it’s just meant to mean ‘say’.

      • King Cricket

        January 24, 2017 at 10:18 am

        It is similar, but it is not the same.

        Speaking as someone who writes cricket articles (as well as articles on other subjects), it’s a sneaky way of attributing sentiments to someone that they may not actually possess.

      • King Cricket

        January 24, 2017 at 10:23 am

        ‘Sneaky’ might be unfair. I think the same thing can be done inadvertently, but with a similar effect.

      • True, it’s slightly different here. I think it’s mostly the Daily Mail anyway, where they use the word when there’s absolutely nothing to ‘admit’.

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