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Wankhede Stadium in Mumbai for the second Test between India and England

Bowled on 14th October, 2012 at 18:47 by
Category: England cricket news, India cricket news

It’s a common misconception that the Wankhede Stadium was named after Matthew Hayden. It actually takes its name from SK Wankhede, who was secretary of the Mumbai Cricket Association in the Seventies.

Recent Tests at Wankhede Stadium in Mumbai

India last won a Test at Wankhede Stadium in 2004. This was another aberration of a Test to which England should pay no attention. You start scrutinising Tests where Michael Clarke took six wickets for nine runs and where does it end? Sometimes you just have to draw a line and say ‘if that kind of thing happens, we’ll wing it’.

Since then, there have been two further Tests and England actually won one of them. It was the ‘Ring of Fire’ Test in 2006 – so named because of Andrew Flintoff’s odd tactic of psyching his team up with Johnny Cash songs. He and Shaun Udal skittled India for 100 in the second innings. It was a right robbery.

The other match was last year. West Indies drew. The match ended with India nine wickets down and one run from victory. It was a great draw.

Conclusions

The last two Tests both saw significantly lower second innings scores than first innings scores. There were also a lot of wickets to spinners. England are lucky enough to have two good ones and should definitely think about picking Monty Panesar as well as Graeme Swann. That said, Jimmy Anderson was very effective when he played here, taking 4-40 in the first innings, despite two dropped catches.

It seems like Wankhede could see a fairly typical Indian-style match where English journalists predict a draw after three days and are then shocked to find that everything’s gone crazy-mental on days four and five. India will be comfortable with this kind of cricket, so we have them down as pretty strong favourites for the second Test.

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  1. Reply
    Deep Cower   //   October 14th, 2012 at 21:01

    India last lost a Test at Wankhede Stadium in 2006. This was another aberration of a Test to which England should pay no attention. You start scrutinising Tests where Shaun Udal took four wickets for fourteen runs and where does it end? Sometimes you just have to draw a line and say β€˜if that kind of thing happens, we’ll wing it’.

  2. Reply
    Sandeep   //   October 14th, 2012 at 22:51

    Udal never played an international game after that test match. Swann should avoid picking up wickets at Wankhede unless he wants a retirement..

    • Ged   //   October 14th, 2012 at 23:51

      Shaun Udal, bless him, only achieved one winter of test cricket in his whole career – that test at the Wankhede being the highlight and climax.

      It was worth the wait.

      He did of course play for Middlesex in the now infamous Stanford series in 2008/2009 which were international games of a sort.

      Shaun Udal was a better spin bowler than Michael Clarke. And less of a tool in the dressing room, by all accounts.

  3. Reply
    sam   //   October 15th, 2012 at 20:48

    In 2003 Udal was banned from playing for Camberley, his club side, for three years after being found guilty of “physical violence on and threats to an opposition player.”

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/england/content/story/133054.html

    • Ged   //   October 15th, 2012 at 23:26

      That’s “white line fever”, sam, not “dressing room tool syndrome”.

      Note the “kiss and make up after play scenario” described by Shaun in his own defence.

      While in no way defending Udal’s behaviour in Camberley, I stand by my assessment of his comparative dressing room behaviour.

      Bear in mind the low comparative standard; Michael Clarke and Matty Hayden, for example.

  4. Reply
    Murtaza   //   November 20th, 2012 at 19:36

    I have a question….why would anyone have a misconception that the Wankhede is named after Hayden??

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