A cricket bat at Rumtek monastery

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Ged writes:

The attached photograph is a monk at the Rumtek monastery in Sikkim brandishing a cricket bat. It is my own photo and the monk enthusiastically volunteered to be photographed.

The middle stump way

Rumtek monastery is a very holy and unusual place. The monks are black hats, which is an unusual strand of Buddhism. One can only wonder at how this lad ended up in the monastery when his enthusiasms so obviously seem to lie elsewhere.

Here is a page from their website, outlinining their ‘one-day practices‘. I wonder what the monks do for first class or Test practices?

Got a picture of a cricket bat or some other cricket item in an unusual place? Send it to king@kingcricket.co.uk

18 comments

  1. i hope he’s planning to bring that bat down straight or he’s liable to nick off. see chris adams circa 1999 or mike atherton circa 2001.

    i don’t really know what circa means.

  2. There’s not enough questions about Latin words in comments comparing Buddhist monks to Derbyshire players these days. You used to get it all the time; now you rarely see it.

  3. If the New Zealanders were Buddhist, they would be Black Hats.

    They’d punch above their weight in one-day Buddhism as well.

  4. They do have plans for 7-day matches, it seems. Not sure what their plans are, but that’s the ineffable thing about it all.

    Circa comes from circus, referring to the fact that the big top is circular, or “a round”. It can also be used to refer to the unexpected appearance of assorted beasts, natch.

  5. Sikkim could have produced great cricketers if there was even one piece of land that was not at a 40 degree incline…. and less than 5000 feet above sea level…

  6. Because I have all my front teeth, and never suffer from heavy colds, does that preclude me from using definition 5?

  7. He appears to be the right handed Lara, Brian’s bat used to point to third man in his backlift at times.

  8. No, Ankit.

    KC also thought the bat might have been mine, but I assure you all that the monk came out to greet us brandishing his own (or the monastery’s) bat.

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